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Poetry In Voice - Poem of the Week

Thanks to Poetry In Voice for including my poem “When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities” (yes, the title poem from my book!) in an online anthology of poems available for their recitation contest—and for making this one their poem of the week. Read it on their site.

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Image, with the original announcement, from Poetry In Voice’s Twitter.

According to their website, Poetry In Voice / Les voix de la poésie is a “charitable organization that encourages Canadian students to fall in love with poetry through reading, recitation, and writing.” Honored and delighted to have my poem included and featured this way.

Love Poems

I love love poems—reading them, writing them (or trying to). I love the falling in love with language that happens with every poem (or so I hope for). I love the bold effort, the tender effort to say, to sing, and to listen more precisely and strangely. I love love poems for partners, friends, plants, waters, family, your own breath.

Grateful to the following places for sharing some of my love poems on Thursday, for Valentine’s Day (a silly, commercial holiday, but maybe at its best a reminder of something sweet; including the literal discount chocolate the next day!):

Kundiman (which itself refers to a genre of Filipino love song)—”First Light,” which was published in Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts and then in my first book and also in Poem-a-Day.

Poetry Magazine on Twitter— “Winter,” which appeared in the Asian American poets issue.

Poets.org on Instagram—”The School of Night & Hyphens,” which was published in Poem-a-Day.

Poems of Gladness

Thanks to Catherine Pierce for the shout-out (to my Twitter!—a recent thread on happy poems) in this candid, moving piece, “On Mary Oliver and Resisting Poems of Gladness,” over on The Millions.

I, too, have been reflecting on my past reluctance to openly celebrate Oliver’s work, to recommend her poems to students, or especially to colleagues. I regret not speaking more often about what Oliver’s work means to me, while she was still alive. I’m determined, now, not to shy away from my enthusiasm, her gorgeous contribution.

Read Pierce’s entire essay here.